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AOPSSS #11 “How the Pro-Beijing Media Influence Voters: Evidence from a Field Experiment”

In our eleventh AOPSSS session, Jay Kao (UT Austin) presented his paper on how slanted media associated with autocracies affects voters. [PaperSlides] He showd that the pro-Beijing media significantly nudges people to support and vote for China’s preferred presidential candidate and adopt more favorable attitudes toward China-related issues. Noel Foster (Princeton), Ji Yeon Hong (Hong Kong University of Science and Technology), Daniel Mattingly (Yale), and Hans H. Tung (National Taiwan University) provided in-depth feedback on a range of theoretical and empirical issues. This paper will be of great interest to those who study China, disinformation campaigns, and foreign interference in other countries!

If you have any questions or comments for the author, please add them below!

Categories
comparative politics

AOPSSS #10 “Repressing Shield and Sword: Strategies of Internal Purging for State Security”

In our tenth AOPSSS session, Harunobu Saijo (Duke) presented his paper examining why leaders employ purges to control their coercive capacities. [PaperSlides] He argues that purges provide a highly targeted method to undermine social networks conducive to collective action. Erica De Bruin (Hamilton College), Franziska Keller (HKUST), Monika Nalepa (Chicago), and Milan Svolik (Yale) offered probing questions and helpful comments on a variety of theoretical and empirical matters. This paper will be of wide interest to those who study Russia, authoritarian regimes, and state violence!

If you have any questions or comments for the author, please add them below!

Categories
comparative politics international relations

AOPSSS #9 “Through the Looking Glass: How Mainland Chinese see the Hong Kong Protests”

In our ninth AOPSSS session, Dimitar Gueorguiev (Syracuse) and Dongshu Liu (City University of Hong Kong). Their paper shows that protester violence has little impact on public opinion when protests are framed in terms of more radical, separatist agendas. [PaperSlidesMark R. Beissinger (Princeton), Graeme Robertson (UNC), and Sarah A. Soule (Stanford) provided in-depth, insightful comments on a variety of theoretical and conceptual issues. Other participants offered a range of suggestions about the research design. Looking forward to seeing this paper published and cited by the contentious politics community!

If you have any questions or comments for the authors, please add them below!

Categories
comparative politics

AOPSSS #8 “White Terror: Collateral Punishment, Defection, and Dissent Demobilization in Repressive Regimes”

In our eighth AOPSSS session, Howard Liu (Essex). His paper examines pre-emptive repression in Taiwan using an awesome new dataset. [PaperSlides] Killian Clarke (Harvard and Georgetown), Travis Curtice (Dartmouth), Martin Dimitrov (Tulane), and Lynette Ong (Toronto) provided in-depth, insightful comments. Other participants offered a range of comments about the theory and empirics. Looking forward to seeing the next version of this innovative paper!

If you have any questions or comments for the authors, please add them below!

Categories
international relations

AOPSSS #7 “Crafting International Apologies That Work: A Conjoint Analysis Approach”

In our seventh AOPSSS session, Shoko Kohama (Hokkaido University) presented her co-authored research with  Kazunori Inamasu (Kwansei-Gakuin University), Toshiyuki Himichi (Kochi University of Technology), Nobuhiro Mifune (Kochi University of Technology), Yohsuke Ohtsubo (Kobe University), and Atsushi Tago (Waseda University). Their paper examines what types of international apologies are more likely to be accepted. [PaperSlides] Yusaku Horiuchi (Dartmouth) co-hosted and discussed along with Jonathan Chu (Penn), Risa Kitagawa (Northeastern), and Jennifer Lind (Dartmouth). The discussants offered a range of really thoughtful suggestions about framing, theory, and empirics. Other participants offered comments about the research design and external validity. Looking forward to seeing the next version of this cool, policy-relevant paper!

If you have any questions or comments for the authors, please add them below!

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AOPSSS Best Graduate Student Paper Award

To encourage more submissions from graduate students, I’m pleased to announce that AOPSSS will give a $300 award to the best paper presented by a Ph.D. student in a calendar year. If you’re a graduate student, please present your work!

Categories
American politics

AOPSSS #6 “Supervision among Agencies for the President: Control over Bureaucracy through Interagency Coordination”

In our sixth AOPSSS session, Takaharu Saito (Univ. of Tokyo) presented his new research on American bureaucracies – “Supervision among Agencies for the President: Control over Bureaucracy through Interagency Coordination.” [PaperSlides] Jesse Crosson (Princeton and Trinity University), Kenneth Lowande (Michigan), and Sharece Thrower (Vanderbilt) provided super feedback on conceptual matters and on the theoretical argument, and other participants offered suggestions about the empirics. Looking forward to seeing another version of this paper, as Takaharu moves forward with his exciting work!

If you have any questions or comments for the authors, please add them below!

Categories
international relations

AOPSSS #5 “Make Two Democracies and Call Me in the Morning: Endogenous Regime Type and the Democratic Peace”

In our fifth AOPSSS session, Daina Chiba (Essex) presented their provocative and exciting new paper with Erik Gartzke (UCSD) – “Make Two Democracies and Call Me in the Morning: Endogenous Regime Type and the Democratic Peace.” [PaperSlides] Kentaro Fukumoto (Gakushuin University), Azusa Katagiri (Nanyang Technological University), and Tore Wig (University of Oslo) offered a range of detailed comments that primarily focused on how to strengthen the papers empirical contribution, and other participants offered a range of comments on technical matters. Looking forward to seeing this paper published, as it’s sure to make a splash!

If you have any questions or comments for the authors, please add them below!

Categories
elections international relations

AOPSSS #4 “How Repression Spreads Dissent: The Diffusion of Election Violence in India”

In our fourth AOPSSS session, Jun Koga Sudduth (University of Strathclyde) presented her ambitious new paper with Max Gallop (University of Strathclyde) – “How Repression Spreads Dissent: The Diffusion of Election Violence in India.” [PaperSlidesNaoki Egami (Columbia), Edward Goldring (USC), and Howard Liu (Essex) provided constructive comments that primarily focused on how to best contextualize the paper’s theoretical and empirical contributions, and the other session participants offered a range of other suggestions. Looking forward to seeing the next version of this paper and, more broadly, where this research agenda leads!

If you have any questions or comments for the authors, please add them below!

Categories
comparative politics international relations

AOPSSS #3: “Public Diplomacy Increases Foreign Public Approval: A Regression Discontinuity Analysis”

In the third AOPSSS session, Ben Goldsmith (ANU) presented his fascinating paper with Yusaku Horiuchi (Dartmouth), and Kelly Matush (Texas Tech) – “Public Diplomacy Increases Foreign Public Approval: A Regression Discontinuity Analysis.” [PaperSlidesTyler Jost (Brown), Matt Malis (NYU), and Atsushi Tago (Waseda) offered detailed, well-considered excellent comments, and the other session participants chimed in with a number of empirical and theoretical suggestions. Best of luck to the authors as they finish preparing the paper for submission!

If you have any questions or comments for the authors, please add them below!