Categories
comparative politics

AOPSSS #29 “Tactical Choices of Moderate Violence and the Escalation of Nonviolent Movements”

In the twenty-ninth AOPSSS session, Pui Fung Law (HKUST) and Myunghee Lee (University of Missouri) presented their new paper on why protesters embrace violent tactics. Minh Trinh (MIT) provided really incisive comments about the paper and the audience offered a ton of helpful remarks. Looking forward to seeing the next version of the paper!

If you have any questions or comments for the authors, please add them below!

Categories
comparative politics

AOPSSS #28 “Why Geographically-Targeted Spending Under Closed-List Proportional Representation Favors Marginal Districts”

In the twenty-eighth AOPSSS session, Amy Catalinac (NYU) & Lucia Motolinia (NYU) presented their new paper showing governing parties steer geographically-targeted spending toward marginal districts under CLPR. Gary Cox (Stanford), Matt Golder (Penn State), and Kenneth Mori McElwain (University of Tokyo) offered detailed comments about a range of theoretical, conceptual, and empirical issues. Looking forward to seeing the next version of the paper!

If you have any questions or comments for the authors, please add them below!

Categories
comparative politics

AOPSSS #27 “A Warning from Above: Why Authoritarian Anti-Protest Propaganda Works”

In the twenty-seventh AOPSSS session, Mai Truong (University of Arizona) & Minh Trinh (MIT) presented their new paper showing that anti-protest propaganda deters support for protests by influencing the audience’s beliefs about government’s intention and capacity much more than it does by shaping their perception of the protesters’ legitimacy. Chen Xi (The Chinese University of Hong Kong) and Peter Lorentzen (University of San Francisco) offered detailed comments about a range of theoretical and conceptual issues. Looking forward to seeing the next version of the paper!

If you have any questions or comments for the authors, please add them below!

Categories
comparative politics

AOPSSS #26 “Open to Authoritarian Nostalgia? Personality, Identity, and the Politics of Authoritarian Nostalgia”

In the twenty-sixth AOPSSS session, Sanghoon Kim (University of Illinois) presented his new paper on authoritarian nostalgia. Matt Baldwin (Florida), Aram Hur (Missouri), and Yuko Sato (Missouri and Tulane), and Elaine Yao (Princeton) offered detailed comments about a range of theoretical and empirical issues. Looking forward to seeing the next version of the paper!

If you have any questions or comments for Sanghoon, please add them below!

Categories
comparative politics

AOPSSS #25 “Environmental Protection after Civil War: A Difference-in-Geographic-Discontinuity Approach”

In the twenty-fifth AOPSSS session, Kyosuke Kikuta (Osaka University) presented his new paper with Yuta Kamahara (Yokohama National University) on how the introduction of independent monitoring mechanisms can make environmental regulations effective even in a post-conflict country. Luke Keele (Pennsylvania) and Renard Sexton (Emory) offered detailed comments about the data and research design. Looking forward to seeing the next version of the paper!

If you have any questions or comments for the authors, please add them below!

Categories
comparative politics

AOPSSS #24 “The Wages of Containment: State-Building, American Grand Strategy, and the Cold War in Europe and East Asia”

In our twenty-fourth AOPSSS session, co-organized with the Cambridge University Press Taiwan Studies Series, James Lee (UCSD) presented his new book on how the international politics of the Cold War affected the United States’ strategy toward state-building in Europe and East Asia after the Second World War. Sheena Greitens (University of Texas, Austin), Koji Kagotani (Osaka University of Economics), Jeehye Kim (British Columbia) and Hans H. Tung (National Taiwan University) offered thoughtful comments on the theoretical argument and cases. Looking forward to seeing the book out in print!

If you have any questions or comments for James, please add them below!

Categories
comparative politics

AOPSSS #23 “Dynamic Policy Responsiveness without Democracy”

In our twenty-third AOPSSS session, Ross Buchanan (UT Austin) presented his new dynamic responsiveness model for nondemocratic polities (with Lingna Zhong). Quintin Beazer (Florida State), Xun Cao (Penn State), and Dan Chen (Richmond) offered fantastic comments on framing and research design. Looking forward to seeing the next version of this paper!

If you have any questions or comments for the Ross, please add them below!

Categories
comparative politics

AOPSSS #22 “Ritual Sacrifices? Transitional Justice and the Fate of Post-Authoritarian Democracies”

In our twenty-second AOPSSS session, Monika Nalepa (University of Chicago) presented chapters from her new book with a case study of South Korea. José Antonio Cheibub (Texas A&M), Andrew Little (UC, Berkeley), B Pablo Montagnes (Emory), and Jeffrey K. Staton (Emory) offered fantastic comments on her formal theory and empirics. Looking forward to seeing the book in print!

If you have any questions or comments for the author, please add them below!

Categories
comparative politics

AOPSSS #21 “How Do Voters Evaluate the Age of Politicians?”

In our twenty-first AOPSSS session, Charles McClean (Harvard) and Yoshikuni Ono (Waseda) presented their new work on whether voters generally prefer older politicians over younger leaders. André Blais (Montreal), Peter John Loewen (Toronto), and Hikaru Yamagishi (Yale) offered deeply insightful comments on theory, empirics, and possible extensions. Looking forward to seeing the next version of this paper!

If you have any questions or comments for the author, please add them below!

Categories
comparative politics

AOPSSS #20 “Audience Costs and Media: The Cases of Obama and Truman”

In our twentieth AOPSSS session, Makito Takei (University of North Texas) presented his new work on the important moderating role of media in generating audience costs. Eric Min (UCLA), Paul Poast (Chicago), Philip B. K. Potter (UVA) andKenneth A. Schultz (Stanford) offered deeply insightful comments on theory, empirics, and possible extensions. Looking forward to seeing the next version of this paper!

If you have any questions or comments for the author, please add them below!