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comparative politics

AOPSSS #10 “Repressing Shield and Sword: Strategies of Internal Purging for State Security”

In our tenth AOPSSS session, Harunobu Saijo (Duke) presented his paper examining why leaders employ purges to control their coercive capacities. [PaperSlides] He argues that purges provide a highly targeted method to undermine social networks conducive to collective action. Erica De Bruin (Hamilton College), Franziska Keller (HKUST), Monika Nalepa (Chicago), and Milan Svolik (Yale) offered probing questions and helpful comments on a variety of theoretical and empirical matters. This paper will be of wide interest to those who study Russia, authoritarian regimes, and state violence!

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comparative politics international relations

AOPSSS #9 “Through the Looking Glass: How Mainland Chinese see the Hong Kong Protests”

In our ninth AOPSSS session, Dimitar Gueorguiev (Syracuse) and Dongshu Liu (City University of Hong Kong). Their paper shows that protester violence has little impact on public opinion when protests are framed in terms of more radical, separatist agendas. [PaperSlidesMark R. Beissinger (Princeton), Graeme Robertson (UNC), and Sarah A. Soule (Stanford) provided in-depth, insightful comments on a variety of theoretical and conceptual issues. Other participants offered a range of suggestions about the research design. Looking forward to seeing this paper published and cited by the contentious politics community!

If you have any questions or comments for the authors, please add them below!

Categories
comparative politics

AOPSSS #8 “White Terror: Collateral Punishment, Defection, and Dissent Demobilization in Repressive Regimes”

In our eighth AOPSSS session, Howard Liu (Essex). His paper examines pre-emptive repression in Taiwan using an awesome new dataset. [PaperSlides] Killian Clarke (Harvard and Georgetown), Travis Curtice (Dartmouth), Martin Dimitrov (Tulane), and Lynette Ong (Toronto) provided in-depth, insightful comments. Other participants offered a range of comments about the theory and empirics. Looking forward to seeing the next version of this innovative paper!

If you have any questions or comments for the authors, please add them below!

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comparative politics international relations

AOPSSS #3: “Public Diplomacy Increases Foreign Public Approval: A Regression Discontinuity Analysis”

In the third AOPSSS session, Ben Goldsmith (ANU) presented his fascinating paper with Yusaku Horiuchi (Dartmouth), and Kelly Matush (Texas Tech) – “Public Diplomacy Increases Foreign Public Approval: A Regression Discontinuity Analysis.” [PaperSlidesTyler Jost (Brown), Matt Malis (NYU), and Atsushi Tago (Waseda) offered detailed, well-considered excellent comments, and the other session participants chimed in with a number of empirical and theoretical suggestions. Best of luck to the authors as they finish preparing the paper for submission!

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comparative politics international relations

AOPSSS #2: “The Business of Immigration: Why Corporate and Mass Preferences Diverge”

In the second AOPSSS session, Rieko Kage (University of Tokyo) and presented her great new paper with Frances Rosenbluth (Yale University), and Seiki Tanaka (University of Groningen) – “The Business of Immigration: Why Corporate and Mass Preferences Diverge.” [PaperSlides] Charlotte Cavaille (Michigan), Kevin Cope (UVA), Alexander Kustov (Yale), Michael Strausz (TCU), and Yu Jin Woo (Waseda) provided excellent discussant comments, and the other session participants offered thoughtful feedback on a range of issues. We’re all looking forward to seeing the next version of the paper!

If you have any questions or comments for the authors, please add them below!

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comparative politics international relations

AOPSSS #1: “Political Regimes and Refugee Entries: Motivations behind Refugees and Host Governments.”

In the first session of AOPSSS, Masaaki Higashijima (Tohoku) and Yu Jin Woo (Waseda) presented their fascinating new paper “Political Regimes and Refugee Entries: Motivations behind Refugees and Host Governments.” [Slides] Loren Collingwood (UC, Riverside), Kevin Cope (UVA), and Adrian Shin (Colorado) offered excellent discussant comments, and the other session participants provided valuable feedback on a range of issues. We’re all looking forward to seeing the next version of the paper!

If you have any questions or comments for the authors, please add them below!