Categories
comparative politics

AOPSSS #22 “Ritual Sacrifices? Transitional Justice and the Fate of Post-Authoritarian Democracies”

In our twenty-second AOPSSS session, Monika Nalepa (University of Chicago) presented chapters from her new book with a case study of South Korea. José Antonio Cheibub (Texas A&M), Andrew Little (UC, Berkeley), B Pablo Montagnes (Emory), and Jeffrey K. Staton (Emory) offered fantastic comments on her formal theory and empirics. Looking forward to seeing the book in print!

If you have any questions or comments for the author, please add them below!

Categories
comparative politics

AOPSSS #21 “How Do Voters Evaluate the Age of Politicians?”

In our twenty-first AOPSSS session, Charles McClean (Harvard) and Yoshikuni Ono (Waseda) presented their new work on whether voters generally prefer older politicians over younger leaders. André Blais (Montreal), Peter John Loewen (Toronto), and Hikaru Yamagishi (Yale) offered deeply insightful comments on theory, empirics, and possible extensions. Looking forward to seeing the next version of this paper!

If you have any questions or comments for the author, please add them below!

Categories
comparative politics

AOPSSS #20 “Audience Costs and Media: The Cases of Obama and Truman”

In our twentieth AOPSSS session, Makito Takei (University of North Texas) presented his new work on the important moderating role of media in generating audience costs. Eric Min (UCLA), Paul Poast (Chicago), Philip B. K. Potter (UVA) andKenneth A. Schultz (Stanford) offered deeply insightful comments on theory, empirics, and possible extensions. Looking forward to seeing the next version of this paper!

If you have any questions or comments for the author, please add them below!

Categories
comparative politics

AOPSSS #19 “The Impact of Education Content on Anti-Immigrant Attitudes”

In our nineteenth AOPSSS session, Boyoon Lee (Penn State) presented her new work on how the driving force behind the anti-immigrant sentiment is not just educational attainment but the content of the education.  Fan Lu (Queens) and Amy Liu (UT, Austin)  offered helpful remarks about framing, theory, and possible extensions. Looking forward to seeing the next version of this paper!

If you have any questions or comments for the author, please add them below!

Categories
comparative politics

AOPSSS #18 “Keep Your Enemies Close: Why Do Dictators Purge or Retain Disloyal Elites?”

In our eighteenth AOPSSS session, Ed Goldring (HKUST) presented his new theory on what drives elite purges in dictatorships. Andrew Boutton (UCF), Stan Hok-Wui Wong (HKPU), and JunHyeok Jang (UC, Merced) offered helpful remarks about theory and how to think about the qualitative case comparison at the hear of the paper. contextualize the case. Looking forward to seeing the next version of this paper!

If you have any questions or comments for the author, please add them below!

Categories
comparative politics

AOPSSS #17 “From Voice to Votes: Electoral Movement, Coalitional Politics and Regime Change in Malaysia”

In our seventeenth AOPSSS session, Lynette Ong (Toronto) presented her new theory on how a broad-based social movement helps to a) build informal partnership across the otherwise fractured political elites and society; b) informal partnership then contributes to formal coalition building in electoral politics; and c) take advantage of an anti-regime political opportunity to amass the support necessary to defeat the regime. The discussants and participants provided excellent comments about how to refine the theory and further contextualize the case. Looking forward to seeing the next version of this paper!

If you have any questions or comments for the author, please add them below!

Categories
comparative politics

AOPSSS #16 “How To Endure Pain Without Democratic Tranquilizer: Controlling Information While Evading Term Limits”

In our sixteenth AOPSSS session, JunHyeok Jang (UC, Merced) presented his paper on how political leaders pre-empt protests against them during and after term limit evasions by limiting the free flow of information. [PaperSlides] Dimitar Gueorguiev (Syracuse), Anne Meng (UVA), and Elvin Ong (NUS) offered thoughtful comments on framing, theory, and testing. Looking forward to seeing the next version of this paper!

If you have any questions or comments for the author, please add them below!

Categories
comparative politics

AOPSSS #15 “Status Threat and Opposition to Gender Equality Policies: Evidence from a Survey Experiment in South Korea”

In our fifteenth AOPSSS session, Jeong Hyun Kim (Louisiana State University) and Yesola Kweon (Utah State University) presented their the psychological determinants explaining this popular opposition to gender equality policies, with a focus on attitudes towards legislative gender quotas. [PaperSlides] Amanda Clayton (Vanderbilt), Mala Htun (New Mexico),Rieko Kage (University of Tokyo), and Jiso Yoon (Korean Women’s Development Institute) provided detailed comments on theory and testing. There was really a lot of excitement about this project!

If you have any questions or comments for the author, please add them below!

Categories
comparative politics

AOPSSS #14 “What Are We Voting For? Opposition Alliance Joint Campaigns in Electoral Autocracies”

In our fourteenth AOPSSS session, Elvin Ong (UBC / NUS) presented his multi-method paper about the effects of opposition alliance joint campaigns on vote choice in electoral autocracies. [PaperSlides] Laura Gamboa (Utah), Masaaki Higashijima (Tohoku), and Paul Schuler (Arizona) offered generous comments on framing and conceptual and theoretical. Best of luck to Elvin as he moves forward with this ambitious project!

If you have any questions or comments for the author, please add them below!

Categories
comparative politics

AOPSSS #13 “The Effects of Village Development Programs on Authoritarian and Democratic Elections”

In our thirteenth AOPSSS session,  Jean Hong (HKUST), Sunkyoung Park (Inchen National University), and Hyunjoo Yang (Sogang University) presented their paper on the short- and long-term electoral effects of village development programs in South Korea. [PaperAppendixSlides] Mark Dincecco (Michigan), Florian Hollenbach (Texas A&M), and Xiaobo Lü (University of Texas, Austin) provided extensive feedback on a range of conceptual, theoretical, and empirical issues. This paper will be of great interest to anyone interested in clientism and authoritarian regimes!

If you have any questions or comments for the authors, please add them below!