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comparative politics

AOPSSS #26 “Open to Authoritarian Nostalgia? Personality, Identity, and the Politics of Authoritarian Nostalgia”

In the twenty-sixth AOPSSS session, Sanghoon Kim (University of Illinois) presented his new paper on authoritarian nostalgia. Matt Baldwin (Florida), Aram Hur (Missouri), and Yuko Sato (Missouri and Tulane), and Elaine Yao (Princeton) offered detailed comments about a range of theoretical and empirical issues. Looking forward to seeing the next version of the paper!

If you have any questions or comments for Sanghoon, please add them below!

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comparative politics

AOPSSS #25 “Environmental Protection after Civil War: A Difference-in-Geographic-Discontinuity Approach”

In the twenty-fifth AOPSSS session, Kyosuke Kikuta (Osaka University) presented his new paper with Yuta Kamahara (Yokohama National University) on how the introduction of independent monitoring mechanisms can make environmental regulations effective even in a post-conflict country. Luke Keele (Pennsylvania) and Renard Sexton (Emory) offered detailed comments about the data and research design. Looking forward to seeing the next version of the paper!

If you have any questions or comments for the authors, please add them below!

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comparative politics

AOPSSS #24 “The Wages of Containment: State-Building, American Grand Strategy, and the Cold War in Europe and East Asia”

In our twenty-fourth AOPSSS session, co-organized with the Cambridge University Press Taiwan Studies Series, James Lee (UCSD) presented his new book on how the international politics of the Cold War affected the United States’ strategy toward state-building in Europe and East Asia after the Second World War. Sheena Greitens (University of Texas, Austin), Koji Kagotani (Osaka University of Economics), Jeehye Kim (British Columbia) and Hans H. Tung (National Taiwan University) offered thoughtful comments on the theoretical argument and cases. Looking forward to seeing the book out in print!

If you have any questions or comments for James, please add them below!

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comparative politics

AOPSSS #23 “Dynamic Policy Responsiveness without Democracy”

In our twenty-third AOPSSS session, Ross Buchanan (UT Austin) presented his new dynamic responsiveness model for nondemocratic polities (with Lingna Zhong). Quintin Beazer (Florida State), Xun Cao (Penn State), and Dan Chen (Richmond) offered fantastic comments on framing and research design. Looking forward to seeing the next version of this paper!

If you have any questions or comments for the Ross, please add them below!

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comparative politics

AOPSSS #22 “Ritual Sacrifices? Transitional Justice and the Fate of Post-Authoritarian Democracies”

In our twenty-second AOPSSS session, Monika Nalepa (University of Chicago) presented chapters from her new book with a case study of South Korea. José Antonio Cheibub (Texas A&M), Andrew Little (UC, Berkeley), B Pablo Montagnes (Emory), and Jeffrey K. Staton (Emory) offered fantastic comments on her formal theory and empirics. Looking forward to seeing the book in print!

If you have any questions or comments for the author, please add them below!

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comparative politics

AOPSSS #21 “How Do Voters Evaluate the Age of Politicians?”

In our twenty-first AOPSSS session, Charles McClean (Harvard) and Yoshikuni Ono (Waseda) presented their new work on whether voters generally prefer older politicians over younger leaders. André Blais (Montreal), Peter John Loewen (Toronto), and Hikaru Yamagishi (Yale) offered deeply insightful comments on theory, empirics, and possible extensions. Looking forward to seeing the next version of this paper!

If you have any questions or comments for the author, please add them below!

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comparative politics

AOPSSS #20 “Audience Costs and Media: The Cases of Obama and Truman”

In our twentieth AOPSSS session, Makito Takei (University of North Texas) presented his new work on the important moderating role of media in generating audience costs. Eric Min (UCLA), Paul Poast (Chicago), Philip B. K. Potter (UVA) andKenneth A. Schultz (Stanford) offered deeply insightful comments on theory, empirics, and possible extensions. Looking forward to seeing the next version of this paper!

If you have any questions or comments for the author, please add them below!

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comparative politics

AOPSSS #19 “The Impact of Education Content on Anti-Immigrant Attitudes”

In our nineteenth AOPSSS session, Boyoon Lee (Penn State) presented her new work on how the driving force behind the anti-immigrant sentiment is not just educational attainment but the content of the education.  Fan Lu (Queens) and Amy Liu (UT, Austin)  offered helpful remarks about framing, theory, and possible extensions. Looking forward to seeing the next version of this paper!

If you have any questions or comments for the author, please add them below!

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comparative politics

AOPSSS #18 “Keep Your Enemies Close: Why Do Dictators Purge or Retain Disloyal Elites?”

In our eighteenth AOPSSS session, Ed Goldring (HKUST) presented his new theory on what drives elite purges in dictatorships. Andrew Boutton (UCF), Stan Hok-Wui Wong (HKPU), and JunHyeok Jang (UC, Merced) offered helpful remarks about theory and how to think about the qualitative case comparison at the hear of the paper. contextualize the case. Looking forward to seeing the next version of this paper!

If you have any questions or comments for the author, please add them below!

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comparative politics

AOPSSS #17 “From Voice to Votes: Electoral Movement, Coalitional Politics and Regime Change in Malaysia”

In our seventeenth AOPSSS session, Lynette Ong (Toronto) presented her new theory on how a broad-based social movement helps to a) build informal partnership across the otherwise fractured political elites and society; b) informal partnership then contributes to formal coalition building in electoral politics; and c) take advantage of an anti-regime political opportunity to amass the support necessary to defeat the regime. The discussants and participants provided excellent comments about how to refine the theory and further contextualize the case. Looking forward to seeing the next version of this paper!

If you have any questions or comments for the author, please add them below!