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comparative politics

AOPSSS #36 “The Erosion of Representational Ties and the Rise of Authoritarianism in Japan”

In the thirty-sixth AOPSSS session, Chris G. Pope (Kyoto Women’s University) presented a paper that examines the changing boundaries of governance in Japan to explain the rise of authoritarianism under former prime minister, Abe Shinzō. Rob Fahey (Waseda) and Jordan Hamzawi (UC, Davis) provided detailed comments on a range of issues and public attendees chimed in with many valuable comments.

If you have any questions or comments for Chris, please add them below!

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comparative politics

AOPSSS #35 “Nationalism and Shared Democratic Identity”

In the thirty-fifth AOPSSS session, Jiyoung Ko (Bates) presented a paper showing that citizens’ tendency to favor hawkish foreign policy upon stimulation of nationalistic sentiments vanishes when they are reminded that another country involved in a dispute is a democracy like their own country. Edward Hearn (Doshisha) and Paul McCartney (Towson) provided detailed comments on a range of issues and public attendees chimed in with many valuable comments.

If you have any questions or comments for Jiyoung, please add them below!

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comparative politics

AOPSSS #34 “Subnational Ruling Party Institutionalization and Its Mitigation Effects on Corruption: A Case Study of China”

In the thirty-fourth AOPSSS session, Rosemary Pang (Pennsylvania State University) presented a paper where she argues that autocratic party institutionalization limits the potentially destabilizing consequences of corruption. Jay C. Kao (Texas) and Andrew Wedeman (Georgia State) provided detailed comments on theory and research design.

If you have any questions or comments for Rosemary, please add them below!

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comparative politics

AOPSSS #33 “Framed National Images Influence Policy Attitudes Among Targeted Foreign Citizens”

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In the thirty-third AOPSSS session, Kasey Rhee (Dartmouth) presented her new paper with me and Yusaku Horiuchi (Dartmouth)  where she finds that diplomatic acts of goodwill by Russia do influence American foreign policy preferences, and decrease support for hostile measures against the country. Matthew A. Baum (Harvard), Timothy B. Gravelle (Survey Monkey), and Kelly Matush (Florida State) offered a range of really detailed comments. We’re very grateful for their careful read of our manuscript.

If you have any questions or comments for us, please add them below!

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comparative politics

AOPSSS #32 “Preferences for Government Concessions amid Protests: A Conjoint Experiment with Causal Interactions in Hong Kong”

In the thirty-second AOPSSS session, Hans H. Tung (National Taiwan University) presented his new paper with Ming-Jen Lin (National Taiwan University) that empirically tests at a micro-level Acemoglu and Robinson’s (2006) commitment problem thesis by conducting a conjoint experiment with causal interactions on protesters in Hong Kong’s recent anti-extradition movements. Milan Svolik (Yale), David Yang (Harvard), and Noam Yuchtman (LSE) offered a range of thoughtful theoretical comments. Looking forward to seeing the next version of the paper!

If you have any questions or comments for the authors, please add them below!

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comparative politics

AOPSSS #31 “Bounded Culture? The Concept of Culture and Its Relation to the Nation State”

In the thirty-first AOPSSS session, Plamen Akaliyski (Keio University) presented his new paper with Michael Harris Bond (Hong Kong Polytechnic University) and Christian Welzel (Leuphana University)  that explains the emergence of nation states as cultures. John Berry (Queen’s) and Adam Komisarof (Keio University) provided a range of thoughtful conceptual comments. Looking forward to seeing the next version of the paper!

If you have any questions or comments for the authors, please add them below!

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comparative politics

AOPSSS #30 “Figurines and Doyennes: The Selection of Female Ministers in Autocracies and Democracies”

In the thirtieth AOPSSS session, Hikaru Yamagishi (Yale) presented her new paper with Stuart Bramwell (Oxford) and  Jacob Nyrup (Oxford) that shows how democracy promotes women’s access into the highest echelons of power. We were all lucky to hear Karen Beckwith (Case Western), Susan Franceschet (Calgary), Malliga Och (Idaho State), and Sona Golder (Penn State) offer incisive comments about the paper. The public audience also offered a ton of helpful remarks. Looking forward to seeing the next version of the paper!

If you have any questions or comments for the authors, please add them below!

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comparative politics

AOPSSS #29 “Tactical Choices of Moderate Violence and the Escalation of Nonviolent Movements”

In the twenty-ninth AOPSSS session, Pui Fung Law (HKUST) and Myunghee Lee (University of Missouri) presented their new paper on why protesters embrace violent tactics. Minh Trinh (MIT) provided really incisive comments about the paper and the audience offered a ton of helpful remarks. Looking forward to seeing the next version of the paper!

If you have any questions or comments for the authors, please add them below!

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comparative politics

AOPSSS #28 “Why Geographically-Targeted Spending Under Closed-List Proportional Representation Favors Marginal Districts”

In the twenty-eighth AOPSSS session, Amy Catalinac (NYU) & Lucia Motolinia (NYU) presented their new paper showing governing parties steer geographically-targeted spending toward marginal districts under CLPR. Gary Cox (Stanford), Matt Golder (Penn State), and Kenneth Mori McElwain (University of Tokyo) offered detailed comments about a range of theoretical, conceptual, and empirical issues. Looking forward to seeing the next version of the paper!

If you have any questions or comments for the authors, please add them below!

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comparative politics

AOPSSS #27 “A Warning from Above: Why Authoritarian Anti-Protest Propaganda Works”

In the twenty-seventh AOPSSS session, Mai Truong (University of Arizona) & Minh Trinh (MIT) presented their new paper showing that anti-protest propaganda deters support for protests by influencing the audience’s beliefs about government’s intention and capacity much more than it does by shaping their perception of the protesters’ legitimacy. Chen Xi (The Chinese University of Hong Kong) and Peter Lorentzen (University of San Francisco) offered detailed comments about a range of theoretical and conceptual issues. Looking forward to seeing the next version of the paper!

If you have any questions or comments for the authors, please add them below!